Your Content Write posts to help you supercharge your site to rank high on Google.

optimise your FAQ page, your content write, rank high on google, increase sales

 

It’s your FAQ page. Many people put them up because… well because everyone else does. But beyond serving your clients with some blatantly obvious answers to things that are mostly covered in your site, what other use does it have?

I can’t even begin to describe… Actually, I can and that’s what the focus of this blog is. So, let’s dive right in.

Let’s look at the basics from a user perspective, then delve into the SEO possibilities that will help your website rank high on Google.

Assuming you are on first name terms with your customer avatar, you will have a site that addresses the majority of your users and presents them with the information that they want, in order for you to make conversions and sales.

That’s all great, but what of your potential clients (The ones who are frantically typing away on Google, hoping and praying for the solutions that you have for their burning wants)? They will have specific questions, phrased in a way that is unique to them and similarly use unique associated keywords.

Wouldn’t it be nice to rank for those specific questions and have the answers ready-made?

That was rhetorical.

Welcome to your new and improved FAQ page…

Below follows a few tips and tricks on optimizing your FAQ page so Google, your customers and you are smiling so much you’d think you all slept with hangers in your mouths.

 

  1. Your website is there because you want the user to perform an action (join a mailing list, buy a product etc). Your FAQ page is no exception. Treat it like a sales page, treat it with the same love and dedication as you would your home page. No more bland and vanilla yes / no answers to unoriginal questions. Make each of your answers enticing – compelling the user to want to take an action. Think of each answer as something you could see on the Google SERP (Search Engine Results Page) and want to click through to a website.

 

  1. Start out with your generic questions then hop onto Google and start to think about how each question could be reworded to match what Google would recognise as a natural link to your service. This does not have to be guesswork. Start to type a question into Google and loads of options will populate below before you have finished typing. These options are not made up, they are there because Google recognise those terms as ones that are frequently put into the search bar. By replicating the appropriate ones (by clicking through and see where they lead), you are answering the specific questions that your potential clients have and you are using the keywords that Google already know and recognise as being related your product or service.

 

Take the Following Example:

 

Imagine you run a parcel delivery service. Think of the most basic question that a user might ask like, ‘When will my delivery arrive?’

Before you have finished typing the word ‘delivery’ Google will already predict what you might want, based on frequent searches. You’ll see those populated below your search.

Click on one and see where it leads. You’ll probably find companies that offer the same service (or similar) to you.

Because the FAQ page is often ignored as a lead generation page you’ll find it easier to rank as the competition is far less.

 

  1. Include links on your FAQ page and calls to action that are relevant to your customer’s specific questions.

 

  1. Don’t assume your text has always answered your user’s questions. Offer them an alternative option for a more in-depth answer (could be a phone call or an email). Let’s face it many people leave FAQ pages, frustrated because they didn’t get the answer they want. By offering them the option to get the exact answer that they want, then the chances of them using you to fulfil their desires are greatly increased as they now know you actually care about serving their wants.

 

  1. Lastly, as discussed on previous posts – look at the keywords that you want your FAQ page to rank for on Google for and make sure they are not in competition with keywords in the rest of your site (Every page has a specific purpose and Google will not rank two pages from the same site on the first page).

 

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Questions and comments are always welcome in the space below.

 

Till next time…

SEO, your content write, rank on the first page of google, content writing.

All righty then…

This is a follow on from my previous post (hence part 2) If you missed that one, please refer to my previous blog.

All caught up?

Good.

When I write content for my clients I do it in two stages:

1. I create an amazing piece of prose that will educate, inspire or entertain (hopefully all three depending on the subject matter of the text). When doing this I pay absolutely no attention to keywords, Google or any of the other search engines out there. My first and most important task is to communicate an idea that will lead to a call to action.

2. After stage one is complete I then look in great detail at the purpose of the page. I want my clients to rank on Google so I try to make the purpose as specific as possible. I am trying to make this as niche as possible thereby making it easier for Google to present the page to the right people.

Generalized Phrases should be avoided as much as possible. Remember Google is not as clever as you (yet) so work has to be done to make the search engine crawler’s job easy.

As an example, if a car dealership wants to rank high for the keyword ‘Cars’ they will find it:

a. Very expensive if they are paying for it.
b. Extremely competitive if they are wanting to appear on the first page.

With such a general term Google has to cast a wide net in the hope that the information you are looking for is on that page.

Typically, you may find:

A few local car dealerships near to where the user is, information on Disney’s Cars, Magazine listings on the top performing cars, Newsworthy items that include cars and a few YouTube videos that have cars in them.

‘Cars for sale’ or ‘Cars for sale in Jarrow’ on the other hand is a lot more specific and helps Google recognise exactly what your page will be about.

Tags

On websites you have Tags (H1, H2 etc). If you are new to this, you can think of them as headings much like you would see on a newspaper article:

(The following news article is FICTION. Don’t get too excited).

 

Daily News

Jeremy the Goose Learns to Speak English!
A Goose was spotted giving directions to a group of tourists.

        Bystanders were today left baffled when a Goose, who later identified himself as ‘Jeremy the Goose’ approached a group of foreign tourists and….

 

 

In the above example, taken from a true story (Not really) The first item we are drawn to is the headline ‘Goose learns to Speak English!’

If we want to draw Google’s attention to a headline in the same way we would place this text in the ‘H1’ tag. This would tell Google what the main focus is.

Google would then read on to make sure the rest of your text lives up to the promise of that tag. If it does, then all is good.

In newspapers we also have a sub heading, designed to draw the reader in further. Google has this too. It’s called the H2 tag. Still important, though not quite so much as the H1.

After this we have main body of text.

Let’s have a quick look at my keywords in this very small body of text.

Already I can see I am likely to rank very well for the key phrase ‘Jeremy the Goose’ and although the word ‘goose’ appears four times in four lines, it does sound very natural.

If I were to continue the article I would be wary of the number of times I use the specific keywords and would perhaps use synonyms as substitutes to ensure Google does not put me on their hit list of keyword spammers.

Naturally, I’m assuming the text on your site will not be speaking of talking geese, but the concept is the same.

If you need help in inserting H1 and H2 tags on your platform leave a comment below and I’ll do my best to help.

WordPress makes it very easy to insert H1 and H2 tags.
Going on the assumption that you already know how to set up a WordPress page or post:

Once you have your text written, highlight the area that you want to identify as the H1 tag and then look up and you will see a drop-down box with the word ‘paragraph’ written on it.
Click on the box and select ‘Heading 1’.
Hey Presto, you have a H1 tag.

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Web Content Writing, your content write, seo, rank high on google, increase sales by supercharging your web content

Do you want Google to love your website as much as you do?

Do you want to increase your chances of ranking on the first page, when a prospective client searches for your product or service online?

That was rhetorical, by the way. I’m assuming that’s why we’re all here.

There’s something I tell my clients quite a bit and that is…

“Think like Google.”

The top techies at Google have the opposite goal. They are trying to make their algorithms so clever that eventually it (Google) will be able to think like a human, thereby producing an exact match for whatever search query you type (or speak) into the search engine.

But they’re not there yet, so for the moment we have to come down to their level and understand what makes Google recognise and rank one web page over another for the same search query.

Now, in future blogs we’ll be tipping our toes into the fascinating world of search engine optimization (SEO), then diving right in. For now, we’re going to look at the most important element and that is, your content.

You may have heard the phrase bandied around “Content is King.” That’s true because it serves two very important purposes:

  1. It helps Google (and other search engines) understand what you do and therefore where you should rank.
  2. It communicates an idea to your readers (hopefully) in a way that will inspire them to perform a desired action. That could be to buy a product or subscribe to a mailing list.

With me so far? Good.

By far, the most important element in the above is number two. You are less likely to rank high if your content alienates your readers. Google looks at popularity as well as readability and purpose when ranking a web page. If people are not engaging with your site it will be seen as not fit for purpose.

I want you to look at each page in your current website if you have one (or if not, start your initial design now). Pen and paper in hand, write down the web page title and next to that write what the purpose of that page is.

After you have done that, realise that you have probably been very general in your description and that description could probably apply to a million other websites. Do it again and be very specific:

Write down in as much detail as you can what the purpose of YOUR web page is.

What we are creating here is a niche. With a niche comes a certain set of keywords that will clearly define your niche (we’ll go into that in a little bit).

Now look at your content on each page and answer the following question with a yes/no:

Does this web page cover EVERYTHING your user would want to know (Not YOU, your user) when reading this page with no questions left unanswered?

If you answered yes to the above then make sure.

With no leading statements ask a target group to read your page and come up with questions. Have them communicate their understanding of the page. You might also ask the user how the page makes them feel and if they are inspired to perform your call to action in the page?

It’s handy if your target group are not friends and family but a small section of people who ‘should’ be likely to want to part with their hard-earned cash to purchase what it is that you have to offer.

Doing this on social media (which we’ll go into in a future post) can be very useful. If people feel like they have helped you then they are more likely to feel a sense of ownership and be engaged with what you have to offer.

Once you have these results then back to the drawing board you go, to re-write your page (Or congratulate yourself on being a content writing genius).

If you answered ‘no’ to the above then rewrite your web page, answering your own questions then follow the steps above.

If you need help with the actual content then please see my previous post:

https://yourcontentwrite.com/how-to-write-stunning-web-pages/

Ok, by this point we have a website that engages your potential client base. That’s great. Well done you.

If it is important for you to rank high on Google too (it isn’t always important, which will be explored in a future post) then jump into stage two.

Stage 2

Earlier you heard me speak briefly of keywords. They are important, but not as important as many people would have you believe.

John Mueller of Google stated in 2014. –

“keyword density, in general, is something I wouldn’t focus on. Search engines have kind of moved on from there.”

My advice is:

  1. Definitely include keywords and synonyms but don’t overdo it and above all make it sound natural.
  2. Once done, test it with your target group. Offer them something free for their assistance and get them signed up to a mailing list or a Facebook group. They will do some of your marketing for you in referrals.

 

There is more to ranking high on Google. This will be continued in my next blog post:

How to write Content that Google and your Customers will simply love (part 2).

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your content write, rank on the first page of google

Your Content Write is still hard at work, creating its long awaited ‘Supercharge Your Web Presence’ course.

As we do this, when we pluck out particular nuggets of information that could help you, we simply post them. If you have any questions post us a reply in the comments section. Enjoy.

 

Today… Hummingbird.

 

Hummingbird is the search algorithm that Google uses to decide what websites to show when a user puts a query into the search engine… and it has recently changed.

It used to be that when you pop a search query into Google then Hummingbird would look at websites with relevant keyword rich content amongst a few other variables. The sites who did this best were the ones who ranked on the first page.

Whilst, in essence this is still true, Google is endeavouring to stop keyword spammers from ranking above the more well deserving sites.

In Google’s own words:

“Hummingbird is paying more attention to each word in a query, ensuring that the whole query — the whole sentence or conversation or meaning — is taken into account, rather than particular words. The goal is that pages matching the meaning do better, rather than pages matching just a few words.”

So, what does this mean for you?

  1. Look at each page on your site and note what the purpose of that particular page is.
  2. Come up with keywords that clearly identify the purpose of that page.
  3. Try not to have more than one page that is trying to rank high for the same keyword as Google wont generally display multiple pages from the same site on the first page (you’d be competing with yourself).
  4. Then write content that is both keyword rich and enticing.
  5. Try to make the copy as comprehensive as possible so the reader does not have any questions, except maybe “Ok I’m sold. Where is the buy / subscribe button?”

If you need any help or have any questions regarding this, Your Content Write will be happy to assist.

Click on the comments below or visit us on  https://yourcontentwrite.com/

Till next time…